Friday, September 20, 2019

Scabious


Here's another one of my plant rescues. Dave and I went to Waitrose, our local supermarket, several weeks ago and saw this plant, a scabious, looking really sad. It was wilted and many of its long flower stalks were broken. It was the last one, and it had been priced down. So we bought it.

("Scabious," by the way, is kind of a gross name, isn't it? A little too much like scabs or scabies. Well, there's apparently a connection -- it was once believed to be a treatment for scabies and other itchy skin conditions. Hence the name. Who knew?!)

Anyway, I brought it home, potted it up and trimmed it back, and now it's doing great -- so great, in fact, that it's blooming again. I think it will overwinter and come back next year. Fingers crossed!

I don't think I've mentioned it yet, but we have an "innovator in residence" this year at the school where I teach -- Kwame Alexander, a well-known writer of books for children and young adults. He's a great guy and he's pretty much based in the library, so I've been seeing him in action quite a bit. Yesterday he led a workshop with our English teachers in which they wrote and published a poetry book in a single day, and although I wasn't participating, it was fascinating to sit by and see (and hear) the process unfold. Some of the teachers wrote remarkably personal and touching poems. I learned a lot, both about poetry and my colleagues!

14 comments:

crafty cat corner said...

Nearly all of the flowers we used to have on our allotment were from the sickly ones that were half price in the garden centre, they all bloomed beautifully the next year. lol
I'm just reading the second book by Jan Harper, remember when you blogged about the first on 'The Dry'? It was you who prompted me to read it and this one is as good.
Briony
x

Mary said...

The innovator in residence sounds amazing. I so hope those teachers will use his techniques with their students. The best English teachers I had in high school and university used those kind of creative approaches and provided wonderful, eye-opening exposure to different writing methods.

e said...

What a wonderful opportunity for your faculty and students! I echo Mary's sentiments.

Ms. Moon said...

Just the title- An innovator In Residence- is so great!
That really is going to add to your school year in a positive way.
Never heard of a scabious. It sort of reminds me of a zinnia which, as you know, is one of my favorites.

gz said...

Rescuing plants s a fun challenge!
Innovator in residence..sounds and is, inspiring

Red said...

Never pass up a workshop. An excellent presenter can make major changes .

The Bug said...

I had the same thought about the name of that flower - in fact I clicked on your post with one eye closed & looking at it sideways, fearful of what I might see (not really - but I thought about it!).

I love Mr. Alexander's glasses! I think he's great just from those specs alone :)

robin andrea said...

Lovely scabious you saved there. We have them here too. Little beauties they are. Very cool workshop, "innovator in residence"... wonder what it feel like to have one in the White House. Oh be still my heart. (I just googled "be still my heart" and read that it's almost always used sarcastically... mine was not meant that way at all.)

37paddington said...

How innovative your school is! Kwame Alexander! We know some people in common. I don’t know him personally but I think he’s very cool. And good on you for seeing the potential in that sad little flower, now a beauty for sure.

jenny_o said...

So can we expect you to be taking part in Poetry Monday (with gusto) from now on? lol But seriously, can we? You gotta do it, just once at least!

Failing that, you could let us in on the expert's secrets - I could use a few tips myself :)

I thought scabious was going to be a plant illness, not a plant! It's very pretty; I like the colour of that one in particular.

ellen abbott said...

a pretty flower with a terrible name.

N2 said...

Also known as Scabiosa, which I like better, and/or Pincushion Flower. I love the way the flower unfurls from the closed "pincushion" bud. Love the "Inovator in Residence" program. Sounds like the California Poets in the Schools program, which is also a great one. x0x0 N2

Catalyst said...

Yes I was thinking 'what a horrible name for such a pretty flower'. Glad you straitened us out.

Edna B said...

I love your little flower. It's beautiful. Have a super day, hugs, Edna B.