Thursday, July 25, 2013

George, and Peak Oil


I wish I had something to say today! I spent yesterday reading and walking Olga -- we went over to Latimer Road, a popular graffiti spot, and even though my enthusiasm for graffiti photography has lately dwindled, I did find a couple of interesting pieces to shoot.

So the royal baby is named George! That seems like a good name. It's been six decades since we've had a blue-blooded George lying around.

Last night we watched a documentary called "A Crude Awakening" about Peak Oil. Now that is a scary scenario. The movie suggests that we are now at the peak of planetary oil production, which will begin to diminish as reserves are tapped out -- and that nothing, no other available energy source, can possibly deliver the inexpensive power upon which we have come to depend. The result will be food scarcity and disruptions to manufacturing, shipping and travel. I've read about all these scenarios before, of course, and actually the movie is already seven years old. Nonetheless, I got to thinking about what Dave and I would do in a situation like that, living in a two-bedroom flat with no arable land in an urban area. I suspect we would eat Olga, for starters.

(Photo: Carpets and beds for sale in Woolwich, on Sunday.)

13 comments:

Lynne said...

No, I don't think it works that way. The appetizer, or starter, would definitely be the caterpillars. Olga, being the main course, would come later.

;)

ain't for city gals said...

Olga might outsmart both of you...

Ms. Moon said...

Funny how humans would far rather be obsessed with the possibility of zombies than the reality of the depletion of our oil.
We are funny critters. Me being one of them.

Vivian said...

oh no...poor Olga...run Olga run!!

Linda Sue said...

If hunger is the issue- I am putting my money on Olga- she will have a fine feast of SteveandDave. Not a bad idea to have the planet shake off the huge human population, a cancer to the planet, always a good idea to have a patch of earth to grow stuff and a climate conducive to winter vegs. England is good, and the PNW. Of course places like Hawaii have year round growing season- San Diego- the south of France, Italy, there are options. Unless Olga is a vegetarian, you might want to consider raising rabbits to save yourselves.

The Bug said...

The idea of you & Dave eating Olga made me laugh out loud (thank goodness my boss isn't here).

Elizabeth said...

Ah, yes. The things we fear most.

ellen abbott said...

one of many reasons I moved out of the city...food. and water, though we are on city water (long story and not by us) all our neighbors are on wells. I could probably make a deal with my nearest. maybe I should keep the foot peddle sewing machine and get it working. then I'll have something to trade.

have you ever seen the movie A Boy And His Dog with a very young Don Johnson?

Angella said...

Olga might turn the tables. Just sayin. She has more practice with unconventional diets that you two.

Reya Mellicker said...

I'm curious about your waning enthusiasm for photographing graffiti - is it just that you're tired of it or has something else replaced it? Or?

No one knows that NOTHING can replace oil. We are very creative, especially when we have to be. I detest those movies made to scare the shit out of me. What can I do about it? They leave me scared AND helpless. Yuck.

e said...

Olga would probably eat you first...

You do more than most city-dwellers:

You don't use a car

You do not over-consume in any area I'm aware of

and you might be able to grow some things from containers if you have some space and do some reading first. That at least beats watching doomsday films.

I sometimes watch films like this and end up thinking, "yes, there are myriad problems...what am I supposed to do?"

Maybe you'll stumble upon something that works for you. I struggle with that.

Nancy said...

As others have commented: with Olga's consumption history, she'd have you and Dave nibbled down to bones by morning.

Steve Reed said...

Lynne: Caterpillar-horseradish salad! I can see it now.

Ain't: Yeah, you know, that's probably much more likely!

Ms Moon: Denial isn't just a river in Egypt!

Vivian: She can hold her own, believe me!

Linda Sue: You're probably right about Olga! I can't imagine trying to raise rabbits in our flat -- but I suppose if there's no food the smell of a rabbit hutch in the living room would not be of great concern.

Bug: We joke about it all the time because she's so muscly. We say, "Let's have leg of Staffie for dinner!"

Elizabeth: It's hard to imagine a complete social breakdown, but when you start thinking about it, it's amazing how broken down things can get!

Ellen: Yeah, I saw that movie several years ago. I think I mentioned it on the blog, actually, though I can't quite remember. I hate to succumb to survivalist impulses, but it's probably a good idea to have access to wells!

Angella: That is true! I'm pretty adventurous about food, but Olga is MUCH more adventurous!

Reya: Re. the graffiti, there are a lot of factors. I used to photograph it because I felt I was making a valuable record, but now so many people photograph street art that I'm not sure my documenting is needed. Also, yeah, I'm just a little sick of it. I'm having more fun with street photography and urban scenery. I like the challenge of making unique photos that no one else could or would take in the same way. As for oil, there truly is nothing -- available now or even in development -- that can generate that kind of power at that price. I think some kind of crash is imminent.

E: All we can do, I think, is try to minimize our consumption as best we can. But that doesn't alter the fact that there are too many people consuming a finite resource at an unsustainable rate -- and a lot of them refuse to even admit it!

Nancy: Indeed she would.