Tuesday, March 4, 2014

Brutalism on Werter Road


When I was walking in Putney on Saturday, I came across this building on Werter Road, across from Sainsbury's. It doesn't look hugely architecturally significant, just another poured-concrete-and-brick Brutalist structure. But don't you love that tile mural in the front?


I'm guessing it was the architect's attempt to dress up an otherwise dreary facade. I think it works.

I tried to find some background about this building -- when it was designed and erected, and for what purpose -- but had no luck. I must admit I didn't closely survey the scene while I was there, but I didn't notice any signs or indications of its use. It looks very '70s.

I did find out during my research that there's another interesting building farther along the same street -- an ornate house with a bust of Kaiser Wilhelm I over the doorway. I didn't walk far enough to see that. Maybe on my next trip!

7 comments:

Ms. Moon said...

Architecture sure went through some sad times there for awhile, didn't it? The mural...helps.

Sharon Anck said...

It is an interesting looking building and the mural almost seems out of place on it. I loved the photo of the guy carrying the Buddha yesterday. That really is a fun shot.

Lynne said...

I like the mural but the building itself doesn't have much to offer in the way of beauty!

Loved the Buddas yesterday!

ellen abbott said...

thank god for the tile facade.

Linda Sue said...

Yes that is a fabulous wall! LOVE IT!

Elizabeth said...

Brutalist? There's really a style called that?

Steve Reed said...

Ms Moon: I actually like some Brutalist architecture, but that raw concrete never seems to age well.

Sharon: Thanks! I'm not sure he was happy I took it, but I couldn't resist!

Lynne: Yeah, the mural is definitely the bright spot!

Ellen: Indeed!

Linda Sue: It reminds me of certain '70s pottery.

Elizabeth: There IS! As defined by the online dictionary, it's "a style of modern architecture characterized by massiveness, a lack of exterior decoration, harsh lines, and the exposure of structural materials."