Saturday, March 8, 2008

Fountain


I went walking with a friend through the plaza at Rockefeller Center last night, where we saw "Electric Fountain," an installation by British artists Tim Noble and Sue Webster. The project was inspired by Rockefeller Center, where it will be on display until April 5.

From the program:

Electric Fountain represents Noble & Webster's modern take on the world's oldest form of public art, the fountain. It simultaneously references iconic pop culture symbols, such as marquee signs in Las Vegas and Times Square, and historical fountains built in civic spaces, such as Bernini's Triton Fountain. A monument for the 21st century, Electric Fountain is a celebration of the spectacle, excess, beauty and desire of contemporary culture and a provocative comment on the nature of consumer society, a theme often present in Noble & Webster's work.

"Electric Fountain mimics the tradition of a fountain as a monument found in public squares around the world, but its magic lies in the emulation of light where water should be," said artist Sue Webster. "During daylight hours the viewer will really get a sense of Electric Fountain's architectural and sculptural qualities as the lights react with the changing moods of New York City's daily weather conditions. As nighttime falls, the sculptural form will slowly disappear into the darkness leaving only the illusion of bright cascading water in its wake."

7 comments:

Merle Sneed said...

What an interesting piece of work.

Squirrel said...

yes it does look like something I'd like to see. It would be nice to see the rink before it stops being a rink, too--the kids always love skating there more than any other rink.

lettuce said...

looks fab - i love the curves against all that linear background

Reya Mellicker said...

Wow, it's spectacular! One of the benefits of living in NYC is you guys get to see so many cool pieces of art. Thank you for sharing your experiences with your readers - otherwise I wouldn't have a clue.

Are fountains the oldest form of public art? I bet statues of the gods are older, though maybe they wouldn't be seen as art.

alphabet soup said...

That fountain is wonderful, we could use a fountain like that right here in Melbourne, we are so short of water these days...

Ms Soup

mouse (aka kimy) said...

wonderful perspective in the top picture ....sorry it's leaving so soon but who knows I may get to see it, if so thanks for the head's up

Gary said...

Thanks for the heads up on this one. I'll have to go and check it out on Monday.

BTW - if you really want a set of the cards my students made please send me your address via email and I'll get them out to you.