Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Cuttings


Well, I'm glad so many of you don't think I'm completely bonkers for rescuing clothes from the woods. Sometimes I wonder myself!

I forgot to tell you, during yesterday's tales of rubbish picking, that the ugly coffee table has been taken away -- presumably by the garbage collectors, but one never knows. Over the weekend, Olga and I walked up Gondar Gardens, the street where Doris Lessing used to live, and noticed that it was gone.

(Do you suppose it was Doris Lessing's table? Did I miss an incredible eBay opportunity here?)


The cuttings from my beloved bird's foot cactus are putting out tiny sprouts. So it looks like both it and the purple heart, which I reported on about a month ago, have successfully taken root. The purple heart, in fact, is looking downright prosperous, with three shoots and many leaves. Woo hoo!

(Top photo: Marylebone, after French class two weeks ago.)

8 comments:

Ms. Moon said...

There is nothing so satisfying to me as successfully rooting a cutting. It's almost ridiculous. But I feel your sense of accomplishment. I truly do.

Yorkshire Pudding said...

I wouldn't want to live at Gonad Gardens.

ellen abbott said...

I left my huge desert rose out one night in early spring. I didn't realize it was going to get as cold as it did but it did and the base turned to mush. surprisingly, the branches were firm. I cut several off and stuck them in dirt with a little rooting powder and it looks like tine new leaves are starting to come forth. yay!

Red said...

Again you have a story to make up about the coffee table and how Doris Lessing loved her coffee table!

lovelygrey said...

I rescued a china mug from the local woods once! x

Sharon Anck said...

You do have a green thumb!

jenny_o said...

Those new shoots are just so darn cute and fuzzy. And, yes, about the coffee table - you needn't have lied, just say it was found near Lessing's street and people will jump to their own (wrong) conclusions!

Sharon Anck said...

I saw one of your photos on the Londonist today in the story about New Cross.