Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Wisteria and Carcinoma


It's wisteria season in London, with housefronts and garden walls suddenly draped in thick purple blossoms. I love this time of year, when those woody, twisted old vines come so brilliantly to life.


So remember how I mentioned that spot on my forehead that won't heal? I went to the doctor about it yesterday morning. She believes it's a basal cell carcinoma, which sounds scary but apparently isn't -- cancer, but non-metastatic and very slow-growing. She all but yawned while diagnosing me. I'm supposed to get a referral to a dermatologist within the next six weeks to have it removed, with either dry ice or topical medication. Personally, I hope they go for the former. I want it off now.

I'm a little surprised because I'm usually careful about sun. I always wear a hat when I'm out for any length of time. But I guess I collect a lot of sun on my forehead even when I'm out for short periods. It's a lot of acreage -- my own personal solar panel.

I stopped by Homebase after work to buy a new light bulb for the kitchen -- so that's one minor domestic crisis resolved. I give myself a pat on the back whenever I successfully buy a light bulb in this country. The vast array of options is truly bewildering.

We're having a bit of a cold snap today and tomorrow -- low temperatures just above freezing. We haven't done anything special for the plants. I think as long as we don't have frost we'll be fine.

16 comments:

Jennifer said...

My husband had the very same diagnosis in the very same spot just last week! I mentioned it in my last blog post. What a coincidence!

e said...

Those are quite common...you will be fine. Hope you can stay warm today.

Yorkshire Pudding said...

You are right about Britain's "bewildering" choice of light bulbs. It drives me crazy. Narrow screw, wide screw, narrow bayonet, wide bayonet, LED, tungsten, lumens, watts, reflector, dimmable, spotlight, opaque, clear, 40w, 60w, 100w etc. etc. You need a bloody degree in light bulbing to understand it all. By the way, could light bulbs cause skin cancers?

Ms. Moon said...

As my dermatologist said when he took something suspicious off of my shoulder, "Even if it is cancer it won't kill you."
I found this very reassuring.
And it wasn't.
Our wisteria this year wasn't much due to that tiny freeze we had. It bit the buds and that was that. Your photos are glorious though.
Why are there so many light bulb choices? That's so weird.

utahDOG! said...

I've had multiple Basals removed over the last few years. The topical cream has worked for me too. Aldera it's called.

John Gray said...

My best mate had it done recently, his minor scar makes him look more interesting

ellen abbott said...

yes, ho hum. I've had several removed and have had two scooped out. the wisteria on the fence around the shop didn't bloom last year and so far not this year. don't know what the problem is as it is growing vigorously. maybe the virginia creeper all over it has something to do with it. I may just cut it back and let it start over.

Red said...

Now that's cool to have a vine covering the house wall.

Sharon Anck said...

The wisteria shots are gorgeous. I've been seeing a lot of them lately on Instagram. I've had at least three of those basal cells removed. One on my face they did surgically in the office of a plastic surgeon. They did it that way to reduce the risk of a scar. The others have all been removed with the liquid nitrogen which is pretty simple. It just stings for a minute or two.
Yes, I do remember seeing the movie "Frida". I loved it but it made me think about how different her life might have been if not for the accident.

Lesley UK said...

Hi, I've had loads of these removed. Just be warned, if they freeze it off they don't tell you how painful it's going to be (only for a few minute, but if you're not expecting it, it's a bit off putting) My consultant also didn't tell me that large scabs would appear. The one on my leg didn't bother me, but the one on the end of my nose was a different proposition! Still all's well that ends well. (hey, that would be a good title for a play I'm writing. What do you think?)

The Bug said...

Gorgeous wisteria!

jenny_o said...

The wisteria is so lovely. I love the second picture especially with the purple against the off-white.

Carcinoma not so much ... As for avoiding the sun's rays, I've read that there is quite a lot of reflection from surfaces, so even wearing a hat doesn't ward that off. Particularly bad around water, snow, sand or concrete - anything that tends to reflect light. Also the damage is cumulative, as you know. What you are seeing now likely had its genesis years ago. Don't stop wearing your hat! And sunglasses! Sunlight is a factor in cataract formation, too.

Cheryl West said...

I have had four basal cell ca's, one in my ear and three on the face. All had to be excised (scooped) called MOHS surgery to make sure they got all the layers. The specialized dermatologist was like a plastic surgeon so the scars are minimal. The sun damage is from decades of sun, not just recent exposure.
The wisterias are gorgeous. Ours will be a few weeks yet and the fragrance is glorious.

37paddington said...

Glad you're taking care of yourself, friend.

Emily Alyn said...

Wow! What a nice house Images are there in it.Cartincoupon.com

Sabine said...

My man had a spot on his upper thigh - a place that had not seen direct sun without protection since childhood. After six weeks of daily ointment rituals, all is well. And so will you.

I love the wisteris - ours has suffered greatly from a freak frost last week. Looks dreadful.