Thursday, September 9, 2021

St. George


Just a quick post today, because I slept late and I have to get out the door and get to work. (One good thing about Olga getting older -- she often no longer wants to go on a walk in the morning, which saves me a good half an hour. She's still in bed as I write this.*)

This picture shows a detail of the metal gates at Marble Arch, where I went to see the Mound over the weekend. The gates are a permanent part of the arch itself. I believe that's St. George -- the patron saint of England -- killing his dragon, although his spear appears to be missing. That was perfect light for a photo, wasn't it?

The flag of England depicts the red-and-white St. George's cross.

By the way, Wikipedia has an interesting page about the legend of St. George and the dragon. I had no idea both St. George himself and the dragon story had origins in the Middle East. I always thought St. George was a knight in the crusades, but it turns out he pre-dates that period. He's mostly legend at this point.

Off to work!

*Addendum, 9 a.m.: As it turns out, the minute I posted and stood up, Olga leaped up too and wanted a walk. And of course she got one, because she's Olga and she runs my life. It turned into a rather rushed morning!

30 comments:

  1. Good old Olga! That’ll teach you. She probably read your post and thought, Oh yeah?!? My mother had a hand-painted etching of St. George and the dragon. I don’t know why. I wonder when the spear disappeared (or was removed). It started from above St. George’s head and went right into the dragon’s mouth. I love bronze.

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    1. I wonder if the spear was a contrasting metal? Or maybe someone considered it a hazard and removed it? Who knows!

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  2. Olga was clearly resting before her expected walk. St George looks like he may be whipping his horse.

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    1. I think he was definitely holding a spear -- as Mitchell said, you can trace the straight line from his right hand, through his left and into the dragon's mouth.

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  3. Good for Olga! Speaking of St. George.....I'm about to walk my George before I head to work. Poor boy had diarrhea all over the rug when we got home yesterday. I'm thinking of asking to come home at lunchtime so I can see if he needs to go out. We don't want another repeat of yesterday! Hopefully he's better now.

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  4. You do have a good eye for detail. Great shot.

    Olga certainly knows how to time things. And we all know who's the master. :)

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  5. That is a most excellent photo! And I wish I was more like Olga and wanted a morning walk - even if not every day.

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  6. just about every christian legend has its roots in ancient religions. that's how they took over, just absorbed the rituals and stories from other religions and remake them in christian context. I wonder if the spear has been lost or if it was never there. it is a great photo.

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    1. It looks to me like there used to be a spear, but that's just a guess.

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  7. That photo is beautiful. The light is perfect.

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  8. You're right- the light was perfect for that perfect photo! Someone needs to get St. George's spear returned to him. Otherwise he'll never kill that dragon.

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  9. Such a work of art.
    Both the iron work and your photo.

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  10. Olga was probably thinking, "Dang, I overslept! I'd better hurry and catch him before he tries to get out of taking me on my walk."

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    1. Ha! Exactly! She needs to realize if she wants to walk, she has to take me up on it when I offer and not when it suits her!

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  11. Our pets do run our lives, don't they? But that's okay because they give us so much joy. I'll have to check out St George and his dragon. You have a super day, hugs, Edna B.

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    1. It's an interesting story, especially when you get into all its roots in various cultures.

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  12. Good for Olga.. keeping you fit!!
    I think George was from Macedonia?

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    1. Was he? I think Wikipedia said some of the earliest St. George-type accounts came from carvings in Turkey.

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  13. As far as I am concerned, St George should not be the patron saint of England. He had nothing to do with our country. A much worthier candidate would be St Cuthbert. King Edward III made George our patron saint in 1350 and he is heavily connected with The Crusades. In contrast, our homegrown St Cuthbert was a pious, intelligent man who did much good in his life and sought peace rather than war.

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